Calendar

Feb
18
Sun
Sunday Platform Meeting: Missing History: What You Learned That Isn’t True
Feb 18 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks, courtesy Library of Congress

History as taught in school, and especially Black History, is either missing a lot of key facts, or distorts them.  Our Society Leader, Jone Johnson Lewis, will introduce a few of the topics that are still commonly misunderstood or ignored, including why Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat, why Anthony Burns matters to American history, and the persistent myth of black Confederate soldiers.

Jone Johnson Lewis is serving as the Interim Clergy Leader of Brooklyn Ethical. She has been an Ethical Culture Leader for 26 years and shares the Society’s interests in both social justice and personal and interpersonal transformation.

Program followed by snacks and coffee/tea — please feel free to bring something to share!

February theme: Persistence.  What does it mean to be a person of persistence?  What does it mean to be a community of persistence?

Feb
25
Sun
Colloquy – Nevertheless They Persisted: The Necessity of Hope
Feb 25 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Colloquy - Nevertheless They Persisted: The Necessity of Hope @ Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture
 This Sunday’s program will be in colloquy style, a chance to hear from many voices in the community about the interdependence of hope and persistence, and to add your reflections, too, if you’re willing. Colloquy will be led by Carl Levine, a long-time member of BSEC, is a lawyer who represents unions, workers and progressive organizations, and life-long activist,
Mar
4
Sun
“Ethical Heroes: The Goldmark Sisters”
Mar 4 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
To celebrate Women’s History Month, and in one of her periodic “ethical heroes” talks, our Interim Clergy Leader, Jone Johnson Lewis, will introduce you to some sisters who are not very well-known, but whose lives include some inspiring lessons for us to learn from.
Josephine Goldmark

Josephine Goldmark, from a public domain image

Dr. Jakob Joseph Goldmark and Regina Wehle came to America after the failure of the Austrian Revolution of 1848.  Among their children were four daughters who each made a mark on society:

  • Helen Goldmark Adler, who was not just the wife of Felix Adler (founder of the first Ethical Culture Society) but did her own work on child development;
  • Alice Goldmark Brandeis, married to the jurist Louis Brandeis, who herself worked for often-controversial social reforms;
  • Pauline Goldmark, an early social researcher and activist on behalf of women workers; and
  • Josephine Goldmark, who worked against child labor and for the minimum wage.

Josephine and Pauline were also key in developing the so-called Brandeis brief for their brother-in-law, used in the landmark Supreme Court decision Muller v. Oregon. (A brother, Henry C. Goldmark, was the engineer who designed the locks for the Panama Canal.)

Come hear more about these sisters and consider how their interconnections with many others helped to create some key social reforms in American history.

Jone Johnson Lewis is serving as the Interim Clergy Leader of Brooklyn Ethical. She has been an Ethical Culture Leader for 26 years and shares the Society’s interests in both social justice and personal and interpersonal transformation.

Program followed by snacks and coffee/tea — please feel free to bring something to share!

March theme: balance.  What does it mean to be a person of balance?  What does it mean to be a community of balance?

Ethics for Children Class
Mar 4 @ 11:01 am – 12:30 pm
Ethics for Children Class @ Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture | New York | United States

Our Ethics for Children program provides a fun, focused learning environment for kids 1 to 12 years old to explore topics that foster empathy, respect and a deeper understanding of self and others. These include: our relationship to the natural world, the diversity of world religions and philosophies, social justice and action, and peaceful problem-solving.

The goal of Ethics for Children is to provide children with skills and knowledge to help them make ethical choices and learn to respect the inherent worth of every human being. We do not impose a fixed set of values or beliefs. Rather, we encourage children to respect and learn about themselves and their environment and to examine how their own ideas and actions impact the greater world.

The program also includes yoga and mindfulness, permaculture and environmental practices, arts, service and volunteering and community building activities.

We focus on 5 major principles:
Care for the Self
Care for the Family
Care for the Community
Care for the Earth
Care for the World

Ethics for Children can also be a full family activity, with classes for all ages and free adult programs at the same time for those who want to attend.

Visit our Ethical Education section to learn more