Calendar

Jul
3
Sun
Frederick Douglass: What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?
Jul 3 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Frederick Douglass: What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? @ Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture | New York | United States

On July 5, 1852, the great orator Frederick Douglass delivered a speech on the “Meaning of the Fourth of July,” now considered one of the best speeches of the 19th century.  Twelve years before the Civil War, and speaking as a man who had escaped enslavement, he pondered the meaning of celebrating independence when many were not free, were not even considered full human beings and citizens.

Join us as we listen to excerpts from the speech, and then consider together the impact of Douglass’ words not only on his audience in 1852 but on us today.  How relevant are his words in today’s American culture?  Our hope is that we are a place where we can have conversations about race, racism and racial justice that just aren’t happening very many places.

Jul
10
Sun
Relating to People With Different Experiences of Life
Jul 10 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Relating to People With Different Experiences of Life @ Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture | New York | United States

Want to enlarge your own and others’ capacity to talk openly and honestly about difficult issues related to race and other dimensions that are used in our larger culture to exclude, “other,” and discriminate? Interested in building skills and opportunities for developing authentic relationships across differences? Through sharing our personal stories in small groups, pairs and sometimes in the larger circle, we’ll continue our summer conversations about race, racism and racial justice.

Jan
22
Sun
Uncommon Heroes
Jan 22 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Uncommon Heroes @ Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture

Clergy Leader Jone Johnson Lewis will introduce you to her top 25 ethical heroes, some of whom you may know, some may be new to you.  What is an ethical hero?  What qualities can we culture in ourselves and our children to help us be more like our heroes?

May
7
Sun
Charley Horwitz Memorial Platform and Haitian lunch with featured Guest Aldon Morris
May 7 @ 11:00 am – 7:00 pm
Charley Horwitz Memorial Platform and Haitian lunch with featured Guest Aldon Morris @ Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture

The Charley Horwitz Memorial Platform:  11am – 12:30pm
This Memorial Platform is held to honor the life and work of a devoted community organizer, civil rights’ activist, labor lawyer and international humanitarian. Charley Horwitz moved to Mississippi from Chicago in 1964 to work for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Council of Federated Organizations and the Delta Ministry of the National Council of Churches. He was President of the Board of Trustees at Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture and Chair of its Ethical Action Committee. Charley also served on the Executive Committee of Brooklyn for Peace and initiated the Israel/Palestine Committee after he and several SNCC organizers visited the Palestine occupied territories in Gaza in 2005.

“Stepping Up Our Organizing Skills” — a teach-in and awards program:  2 – 4pm
The Du Bois Bunche Center for Public Policy & The Brooklyn Society for Ethical Culture co-host a special awards program and teach-in*
“Stepping Up Our Organizing Skills”
Program will honor local activists, organizers, and scholars, who will lead a discussion about ‘leveling up’ our organizing methods and opportunities.

Featuring: Dr. John Flateau, Professor Aldon Morris, Rebecca Lurie, Joey Pressley, Sister Bisi, Greg Todd, Elvira Basevich, Nola Asantewaa, Mark Winston Griffith among others.
Celebrate the accomplishments of our honorees and share the passion and commitment of community organizers.
Please RSVP by clicking HERE

Featured Speaker: Aldon Morris is the Leon Forrest Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University and the author of The Scholar Denied where he argues that W.E.B. Du Bois was the founder of modern America sociology and that his contributions to the field were suppressed for decades due to institutional racism.  Born in Tutwiler, Mississippi, Morris experienced Jim Crow racism and segregation and the lynching of 14-year old Emmett Till.

The Charley Horwitz Platform is held annually to honor the life and work of a devoted community organizer, civil rights activist, labor lawyer and international humanitarian.

For more details about Charley Horwitz the event and, for donations please CLICK HERE.